What Are Our Kids Reading At School? At Least One Common Core Book Is Full of Smut

Would you want your high school kids reading 50 Shades of Grey as part of a standards-based reading program? What about a book packed with lust and sex, with a little incest and rape thrown in for good measure?

While 50 Shades of Grey isn't part of the Common Core reading standard—and probably never will be—there is at least one book on the list that's packed full of smut. The Bluest Eye, by author Toni Morrison, is about a Depression era girl who wishes she wasn't black. Let's take a quick look at a passage from the book:

"Removing himself from her was so painful to him he cut it short and snatched his genitals out of the dry harbor of her vagina."

Yes, that passage and many more just like it are awaiting your high school students if they choose this book from their common core reading list. There are even worse passages that delve in depth into molestation and pedophilia, but I couldn't bring myself to type them out and include them here. I don't usually agree with parents calling for certain books to be banned from school reading lists. I think bans on books like The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Of Mice and Men and The Lord of the Flies are ridiculous. These are literary classics containing valuable life lessons. Yes, the books contain profanity and, in some cases, racial slurs. What they don't contain is graphic and disgusting depictions of incest, rape and pedophilia.

I can tolerate profanity and the occasional racial slur in a book high school students are allowed to read. Profanity is part of life and I've been known to utter the occasional string of swear words at home when I stub my toe or my favorite football team loses. As far as racial slurs go, I don't like them one bit, but think the use of them in books gives an accurate depiction of life in the era in which the books were written and good teachers and parents will use them as a jumping off point for discussions on racial equality and how things weren't always the way they are now.

If you're interested in seeing more passages from the book, they can be found here. Be prepared to blush—and to get angry if your student attends school in a district that has adopted the Common Core reading standards. I don't, but I'll be one of the first in line to complain if and when Common Core makes it to my local high schools.